This Technology Tags Your Photos Based on Relationships

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Since 2010, Facebook has used facial recognition software to automatically tag your friends in photos. Now one researcher has come up with an algorithm that tags photos based on the relationships that people in images already have with each other.

The algorithm uses the name and location of existing photo tags to build a "relationship graph," where personal connections in the images are calculated. That makes it faster and more efficient at tagging pictures compared to what's currently used by sites such as Facebook and Flickr

For example, if a father and daughter appear in tagged images consistently, untagged photos featuring them can be tagged automatically. If the daughter is in an image with both of her parents, but the father is untagged, the algorithm is able to recognize him based on their other images together. Read more...

More about Facebook, Photo, Flickr, Photographs, and Patent

Facebook Home Opens Up to Instagram, Pinterest Content

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As promised, Facebook is adding new content to its Facebook Home lock screen. This news, announced Thursday, means that Facebook Home for Android beta testers can now access Instagram, Pinterest, Flickr and Tumblr content without having to unlock their phones

Users will be able to Like and view posts from these other services, but it isn't clear what other apps (like Twitter) may be available to Home users in the future

The news comes just a few weeks after Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg openly discussed the soon-to-be released update at TechCrunch's Disrupt event in San Francisco. Facebook Home, the software that lets Android users bring Facebook updates and content directly to their lock screen, was released in April and has since been deemed a relative misstep in Facebook's revitalized mobile strategy Read more...

More about Facebook, Flickr, Tumblr, Instagram, and Pinterest

Flickr Not Dead, But Losing The Soul Of Photo Sharing

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The buzz in photography circles this past weekend was a post by Thomas Hawk declaring “Flickr is Dead.” It’s not the first time we’ve heard this attention-grabbing headline. By the numbers, its hard to call a photo sharing site with more than 5 billion photos “dead” just yet, and Hawk admits it will take time. But, Yahoo-owned Flickr is facing increasing competition and influential photographers are choosing to upload elsewhere.

Hawk, who was an early Flickr evangelist, first asks readers to compare his Flickr page, with its “same view since 2004″ to his infinite scrolling Google+ photo page. But his real moment of realization came last week. Trey Ratcliff, an expert in HDR photos who also runs a popular travel photo blog called “Stuck In Customs“, led a photowalk at Stanford that more than 200 photographers of all skill levels attended. There are still trying to confirm this, but it might have been a “World Record” photowalk turnout.

Hawk writes “What was everybody talking about at the photowalk? Flickr? No. Google+? Yes. Not only was everyone talking about Google, there were tons of people from Google who were there.” The list of Googlers included the Google Photos Community Manager and the guy who build their lightbox.

I attended the very informative walk. It may have been the first Google+ flash mob. At times I thought the event was an official Google company event, but it wasn’t. Everyone was talking about photography and Google+. The group photo (above) was posted to Google+ and many faces tagged. Everyone was invited to add their photos and comments about the walk on Google+.

Hawk recalls “Flickr used to feel like this.” Years ago, he says Flickr co-founder Steward Butterfield would attend the Flickr meetups. But, those meetups don’t happen any more. A SF Flickr Group had only 3 posts this year. He writes Yahoo CEO Carol Bartz doesn’t have a Flickr account, while Google co-founder Sergey Brin posted underwater photos last week to Google+.

There are still many more people putting pictures on Flickr compared to the newcomer Google+. And one photowalk isn’t going to change everything. But, many passionate and influential photographers are switching from Flickr to Google Photos and a host of other photo sharing sites like 500px and Instagram.

Most importantly, in Hawk’s view, Flickr has “lost the soul of photosharing. They’ve lost the spirit of photosharing — the zest and the passion and love — and while they got away with that for a long time due to lack of competition, thanks have now changed.”

Frederick Van Johnson, the host of the popular photography podcast, This Week in Photo (TWiP), agrees. He told me “Flickr’s lack of innovation is a crime that’s punishable by death — and we the jury are voting with where we choose to host our photos.”

In additional to Google Photos, Flickr is facing competition from Instagram, launched just 9 months ago and only available on the iPhone. Instagram just reported its 150 millionth photo. It took Flickr nearly 2 years to reach 100 million photos.

TechCrunch has been reporting on Flickr’s problems for awhile. Earlier this year, Michael Arrington stopped using Flickr. He explained his reasons in a post called “I Won’t Use Flickr Until They Release My Photo Hostages.” Flickr’s head of product, Matthew Rothenberg left in March. The founders, Caterina Fake and Steward Butterfield, who created the company in 2004, sold it to Yahoo in 2005, and left in 2008. Alexia Tsotsis wrote about the Flickr designer who publicly criticized Flickr’s design.

Hawk’s article has generated some good discussion on his blog, Hacker News and Google+. Commentors pointed out that Hawk has 60,000 photos in his Flickr photostream which appears to the right of his “Flickr is Dead” post. But that just shows someone like Hawk, who is clearly a power user of Flickr, is not happy. He’s the type of paying “Pro” user Flickr needs to keep.

A commenter named Jolene compared Flickr to an ex-beau. “It’s still out there… you remember how much in love you once were, how you thought it was going to be forever. Eventually, you grew apart.”

In researching this article, I learned from the Flickr blog that its 5 billionth photo was uploaded last September. But on the first page of its welcome tour, it claims just “over 4 billion photos.” In addition to a lack of innovation and updates on the product, Flickr can’t even update the information on its own site to reflect the addition of 1 billion more photos. How many billion more will it get?

Photo Credit: Peter Adams, posted on Google+



Company:
FLICKR

Former game designers Stewart Butterfield and Caterina Fake created Flickr, an online photo sharing network, in 2004. Flickr, which began as a photo-sharing feature of their gaming project,...

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Product:
GOOGLE+
Company
Google

A Google project headed by Vic Gundotra and Bradley Horowitz, Google+ is designed to be the social extension of Google. Its features focus on making online sharing easy for...

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Company:
GOOGLE
Launch Date:
7/9/1998
IPO:
25/8/2004, NASDAQ:GOOG

Google provides search and advertising services, which together aim to organize and monetize the world’s information. In addition to its dominant search engine, it offers a plethora of...

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Company:
YAHOO!
Launch Date:
1/1/1994
IPO:
12/4/1996, Nasdaq:YHOO

Yahoo was founded in 1994 by Stanford Ph.D. students David Filo and Jerry Yang. It has since evolved into a major internet brand with search, content verticals, and other...

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Klout Adds Blogger, Flickr, Instagram, Last.fm & Tumblr

Klout Adds Blogger, Flickr, Instagram, Last.fm and Tumblr

Klout just doubled the number of services it measures to determine your online influence, adding Blogger, Flickr, Instagram, Last.fm and Tumblr to its scoring system.

The San Francisco-based startup, which is celebrating its three-year anniversary today, originally only took Twitter activity into consideration. Two years later, Klout added Facebook.

But in June, it began factoring in LinkedIn. And within the past month, it integrated Foursquare and YouTube to its algorithm.

“The networks we launched today were chosen to give the Klout score a more holistic view of influence,” Klout CEO Joe Fernandez told Mashable. “By adding blogging, photos and music to the interactions that we are already measuring we are moving closer to our goal of providing a complete picture of your influence.”

Klout will calculate your influence on these new networks based on the ways you drive actions among your online friends, followers or subscribers.

“On Last.fm the amount of activity a user or listener generates on their profile will almost certainly be a factor,” Fernandez said. “Tumblr is a great example where reblogs and love are clear signals of influence, and Instagram provides likes and comments.”

Klout also plans to add more services such as Google+: “We are eagerly anticipating them launching their API. As soon as they make the data available we will be ready to add it to the Klout score,” he said.

If you log onto Klout, you’ll notice your dashboard now features grayed-out icons for the five newly-integrated services. Click on the icons to have Klout figure in your activity on those services into your overall Klout score.

“Today is actually the three-year anniversary of Klout and we wanted to show off the power of the platform we have built here,” Fernandez said. “The fact that we have launched eight other services — with five today — in the last three months is a testament to the hard work our team has done building a platform that can easily ingest any signal of influence.”

SEE ALSO: Klout CEO Reveals Details About Foursquare Integration

Aside from adding more services in just a few months, Klout also recently unveiled a +K button that allows you to give other users a +K on topics you think they influence. And brands have started offering perks to people with high Klout scores.

Are you excited or bummed that Klout added Blogger, Flickr, Instagram, Last.fm and Tumblr?

More About: blogger, facebook, flickr, foursquare, instagram, klout, last fm, linkedin, tumblr, twitter, youtube

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Iceland Unveils Crowdsourced Constitution


Icelanders on Friday delivered what may set the template for other governments: a crowdsourced constitution.

A group of 25 citizens presented a draft of the constitution to Iceland’s parliament. The group, which is made up of ordinary residents, compiled the document online with the help of hundreds of others. The constitution council posted the first draft in April on its website and then let citizens comment via a Facebook Page. The council members are also active on Twitter, post videos of themselves on YouTube and put pictures on Flickr.

Iceland’s original constitution was created in 1944 when the country gained independence from Denmark. The country’s economic collapse in 2008 prompted calls for a rewrite with checks and balances to prevent a repeat of the financial crisis. The draft was due before the end of July. It may be put to a referendum without the input of parliament.

Iceland may be ahead of the curve on using social media to inform its new government, but it is not alone: Earlier this month, volunteers at a series of hackathons at Stanford University created a site where Egyptians could discuss their proposed constitution.

Image courtesy of Flickr, WorldIslandInfo

More About: crowdsourcing, facebook, flickr, Iceland, twitter, youtube

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Iceland Unveils Crowdsourced Constitution


Icelanders on Friday delivered what may set the template for other governments: a crowdsourced constitution.

A group of 25 citizens presented a draft of the constitution to Iceland’s parliament. The group, which is made up of ordinary residents, compiled the document online with the help of hundreds of others. The constitution council posted the first draft in April on its website and then let citizens comment via a Facebook Page. The council members are also active on Twitter, post videos of themselves on YouTube and put pictures on Flickr.

Iceland’s original constitution was created in 1944 when the country gained independence from Denmark. The country’s economic collapse in 2008 prompted calls for a rewrite with checks and balances to prevent a repeat of the financial crisis. The draft was due before the end of July. It may be put to a referendum without the input of parliament.

Iceland may be ahead of the curve on using social media to inform its new government, but it is not alone: Earlier this month, volunteers at a series of hackathons at Stanford University created a site where Egyptians could discuss their proposed constitution.

Image courtesy of Flickr, WorldIslandInfo

More About: crowdsourcing, facebook, flickr, Iceland, twitter, youtube

For more Social Media coverage:

Iceland Unveils Crowdsourced Constitution


Icelanders on Friday delivered what may set the template for other governments: a crowdsourced constitution.

A group of 25 citizens presented a draft of the constitution to Iceland’s parliament. The group, which is made up of ordinary residents, compiled the document online with the help of hundreds of others. The constitution council posted the first draft in April on its website and then let citizens comment via a Facebook Page. The council members are also active on Twitter, post videos of themselves on YouTube and put pictures on Flickr.

Iceland’s original constitution was created in 1944 when the country gained independence from Denmark. The country’s economic collapse in 2008 prompted calls for a rewrite with checks and balances to prevent a repeat of the financial crisis. The draft was due before the end of July. It may be put to a referendum without the input of parliament.

Iceland may be ahead of the curve on using social media to inform its new government, but it is not alone: Earlier this month, volunteers at a series of hackathons at Stanford University created a site where Egyptians could discuss their proposed constitution.

Image courtesy of Flickr, WorldIslandInfo

More About: crowdsourcing, facebook, flickr, Iceland, twitter, youtube

For more Social Media coverage:

Iceland Unveils Crowdsourced Constitution


Icelanders on Friday delivered what may set the template for other governments: a crowdsourced constitution.

A group of 25 citizens presented a draft of the constitution to Iceland’s parliament. The group, which is made up of ordinary residents, compiled the document online with the help of hundreds of others. The constitution council posted the first draft in April on its website and then let citizens comment via a Facebook Page. The council members are also active on Twitter, post videos of themselves on YouTube and put pictures on Flickr.

Iceland’s original constitution was created in 1944 when the country gained independence from Denmark. The country’s economic collapse in 2008 prompted calls for a rewrite with checks and balances to prevent a repeat of the financial crisis. The draft was due before the end of July. It may be put to a referendum without the input of parliament.

Iceland may be ahead of the curve on using social media to inform its new government, but it is not alone: Earlier this month, volunteers at a series of hackathons at Stanford University created a site where Egyptians could discuss their proposed constitution.

Image courtesy of Flickr, WorldIslandInfo

More About: crowdsourcing, facebook, flickr, Iceland, twitter, youtube

For more Social Media coverage:

Iceland Unveils Crowdsourced Constitution


Icelanders on Friday delivered what may set the template for other governments: a crowdsourced constitution.

A group of 25 citizens presented a draft of the constitution to Iceland’s parliament. The group, which is made up of ordinary residents, compiled the document online with the help of hundreds of others. The constitution council posted the first draft in April on its website and then let citizens comment via a Facebook Page. The council members are also active on Twitter, post videos of themselves on YouTube and put pictures on Flickr.

Iceland’s original constitution was created in 1944 when the country gained independence from Denmark. The country’s economic collapse in 2008 prompted calls for a rewrite with checks and balances to prevent a repeat of the financial crisis. The draft was due before the end of July. It may be put to a referendum without the input of parliament.

Iceland may be ahead of the curve on using social media to inform its new government, but it is not alone: Earlier this month, volunteers at a series of hackathons at Stanford University created a site where Egyptians could discuss their proposed constitution.

Image courtesy of Flickr, WorldIslandInfo

More About: crowdsourcing, facebook, flickr, Iceland, twitter, youtube

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Social Media Day 2011 Around the World [PHOTOS & VIDEOS]


Thursday’s second annual Social Media Day celebration was a huge success throughout the world. Thousands of people came together offline in their local communities to recognize the technological advancements that enable everyone to connect with real-time information, communicate from miles apart and have their voices be heard.

Participation in the event more than doubled since last year with more than 1,400 Meetups and nearly 11,000 attendees. Seven cities and one U.S. state joined Vancouver and Victoria, B.C. in proclaiming the day official. The state of Arizona and the cities of New York, Toronto, Dublin, Las Vegas and Reno, Nevada and San Jose and San Carlos, California officially marked June 30 as Social Media Day.

Around the world, Social Media Day Meetups took place in 90 countries across six continents. Some of the most well-attended events occurred in places like Sao Paolo, Panama City, Toronto, Detroit and Santa Ana, California.

Nearly 43,000 tweets were sent with hashtag #smday, and 26,000 of those were on Thursday alone. Notable accounts such as Facebook, DKNY, WWE Universe, and the Miami Heat mentioned #smday on Twitter, showing the event’s reach across a wide variety of communities. There are more than a thousand photos on Flickr, Instagram and Facebook as well as hundreds of videos on YouTube with hashtag #smday.

A number of media organizations, including Fox News, CNN Money, The Christian Science Monitor, the Los Angeles Times and The Examiner covered the event. Many news stories focused on social media’s growth and how it has affected many of our lives.

A huge thank you to everyone who organized or attended a Social Media Day 2011 Meetup. Without you, this global event wouldn’t be the success that it is.

Who’s ready for next year?!


Social Media Day Photos



Cincinnati




An awesome Social Media Day cake was made for #SMDay Cincinnati, the winners of our Most Social City contest. Photo by Christiaan Todd Photography.


Detroit




Detroit had more than 1,000 people attend their Social Media Day events held at Soundboard in the MotorCity Casino Hotel. Guests were treated to djs, prizes and speakers.


Key West




Mashable Director of Communications Stacy Green and attendees at the Social Media Day celebration in Key West, Florida.


Miami




Miami's Social Media Day celebration was hosted by SocialBuzzTV at Sugarcane Raw Bar and Grill.


New York City




Mashable celebrated Social Media Day at Brooklyn Bowl, where many attendees took to the lanes. Photo by Stephanie Haberman.


New York City




NYC Chief Digital Officer Rachel Sterne presented the city's proclamation declaring June 30 Social Media Day to Mashable Publisher Sharon Feder and Community Manager Meghan Peters. Photo by Stephanie Haberman.


Tunis




Tunisia's capital city held a large Social Media Day celebration at Barista's Cafe.


San Francisco




Mashable staffers Kate Hayden, Louis Dorman, and Jennifer Van Grove celebrate Social Media Day with Mashable fans at House of Air.


Istanbul




More than 100 people met up in Istanbul, Turkey for Social Media Day. The organizers said they even made frozen shot glasses with the #SMDay logo on them.


Sao Paulo




Sao Paulo, Brazil had several Social Media Day Meetups, including one led by Anderson Criativo that had 1,000 attendees. "The most successful part was the engagement of our community," Criativo said.


Social Media Day Videos



Paris’ Social Media Day celebration. Video by James Medd.


San Francisco’s Social Media Day celebration. Video by Danny Skarka.

Thumbnail photo courtesy Flickr, Anthony Quintano.

Mashable community team members Stephanie Haberman, Todd Olmstead and Chelsea Stark contributed to this report.



Find a Mashable Meetup Near You »


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