Instagram Launches Live Video & Ephemeral Messages: Here’s What You Need to Know

Instagram Updates Recap.jpg

Some of the greatest discoveries of all time came to fruition at the intersection between two ideas. Think about it: Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, pajama jeans, and sporks ... just to name a few.

This week, Instagram proved the power of cross-pollinating ideas once more when it announced the addition of live video on Instagram Stories and disappearing photos and videos in Instagram Direct.

If those new feature announcements look and feel a whole lot like the experiences you're used to on Snapchat and Facebook Live, your instincts aren't wrong. Instagram's new features directly reflect a larger shift in the user's desire to share content "freely and in the moment," as explained in the official announcement. Download our complete guide to using Instagram for business and marketing here. While these features will be rolling out globally over the next few weeks, we wanted to make sure you were equipped with the know-how to start planning your strategy right now. Below, we'll dive into each of the new features in detail, covering everything you need to know about what to expect, how to get started, and what this means for social media managers and marketers.

What's Different About Instagram's New Features?

To answer the question that everyone is asking themselves right off the bat: Yes, the live content update does seem eerily similar to Facebook Live.

But there are actually some noteworthy differences that set Instagram's live video feature apart. And from a technical standpoint, Instagram's live content is better represented as a healthy mix between Facebook Live and Snapchat.

The key difference between live video on Instagram Stories and Facebook Live is that live Instagram video disappears once the publisher finishes the broadcast, creating the transient experience offered by Snapchat.

“It’s a bi-directional experience, and you only get that when you’re actually live with someone,” Instagram's Head of Product Kevin Weil told Recode.

But that's not the only difference. According to that same Recode article, Instagram has no plans to pay media companies or celebrities to hop on a broadcast. This suggests that live Instragam content is intended to be less about creating important moments that need to be saved, and more about sharing unscripted, real-time experiences with friends and family.

Wired Staff Writer Davey Alba echoed this in her recap of the announcements:

With Instagram Stories, Facebook seems to be trying out a tack it used (to great effect) with messaging, splitting the use cases for Facebook Messenger (a tool for expression, as CEO Mark Zuckerberg explains it) and WhatsApp (a “more utilitarian” messaging app). Similarly, Facebook Live looks to be a more robust tool for archiving important video, while Instagram Stories is for your friends’ eyes only."

As for the introduction of disappearing photos and videos in Instagram Direct, the divergence from Snapchat's functionality is less obvious. In fact, one of the only major distinctions between the two is that Instagram makes it easier for users to continuously send disappearing messages to a set group of friends, whereas Snapchat requires you to manually select recipients each time.

In other words, the process for sending Instagram's ephemeral direct messages mirrors a "group text" experience, which is informed by the company's knowledge of users' adoption of Instagram Direct over the last year. Since that launch, users have grown from 80 million to 300 million people around the world -- and many of them are using the messaging feature to share content with group threads, according to the official announcement.

Ready to see these updates in action? Let's walk through each step.

How to Get Started with Live Content and Disappearing Messages on Instagram

How to Go Live on Instagram:

1) Open the Instagram app and navigate to 'Your Story' in the top left corner.


Instagram Live 2.jpeg

2) Toggle left at the bottom of the screen to select the 'Live' option. Then, tap 'Start Live Video.'

Slack for iOS Upload-2.(null).jpeg

Just like on Facebook Live, comments will appear in a feed at the bottom of the screen during your recording. Here's an example we captured:

Instagram Live comments.jpeg

In the live view, you can also keep tabs on the number of viewers checking out your broadcast by referring to the number in the top right corner.

3) Once you end the broadcast, you'll see the following screen, complete with a final view count and timestamp. To return to your feed, tap 'Done.'

Slack for iOS Upload-3.(null).jpeg

We recommend taking note of the total number of viewers and the duration of your broadcast to inform your strategy in the future.

Looking for more ways to inspire your videos down the line? Check out the Explore tab to view live stories from others. Simply tap 'Top Live' to watch live stories unfold in real time, and swipe right and left to skip ahead or go back.

Top Live Stories Instagram.jpeg

How to Send a Disappearing Message on Instagram:

1) Open the Instagram app and swipe right to open the camera view. You can snap a photo by tapping the white circle button, or hold the button down to capture a video.

Instagram Message.jpeg

2) To add text or doodle on your photo or video, use the annotation icons in the top right corner.

Add Doodle Instagram Message.jpeg

(Need artistic inspiration? Check out this roundup of clever Snapchat drawings.)

3) When you're ready to send the message, tap the white arrow button.

Send Private Instagram Message.jpeg

4) Time to select your recipients. You can either select one or several people to send the message to directly or tap 'New Group' in the top right corner to create a group message.

To select users to add to a direct message, simply tap the circle next to their name to turn it into a blue check mark. If you're creating a group, tap 'Create' in the corner once you're done adding recipients.

(Note: You have the option to name the group, too. This makes it easy to find and use it again when you want to send a message to the same people.)

fae4a21e-617b-4e9a-a7b6-8ee6568a6b1f_960.jpg

5) To view your direct messages, tap the new airplane icon in the top right corner of your feed or swipe left.

A few things to note about sending and viewing messages:

  • A blue ring will appear around a new message in your inbox.
  • In a group message, you can see others' responses, as well as who else has seen them.
  • To send a response, simply tap the user's faded profile photo.
  • You'll be notified if a friend replays or screenshots your message.
  • You can only send disappearing messages to those you follow -- regardless of whether your account is private or public.

View Instagram Messages.jpeg

So now you know how to get started, but what does this all mean for marketers and the future of Instagram? Let's walk through all of that below.

The Era of Ephemeral Marketing Is Here

As marketers, you already know the importance of catering your social media content distribution to the platform you're publishing on. You might turn to Twitter for snappy, 140-character breaking news, or Snapchat for a selfie of you and your coworker disguised by a funny filter. But the etiquette on Instagram was in a league of its own -- until just recently, at least.

"Each social network has its differentiating factor, and Instagram has always been a place to showcase the most beautiful, curated version of your life," explained HubSpot's Social Media Marketing Manager Marissa Emanuele in a post following the announcement of Instagram Stories back in August.

The introduction of Instagram Stories was the social network's first foray into a more authentic and open sharing environment, as it lowered the stakes for those feeling pressure to produce the perfect Instagram post. Unlike the traditional Instagram post, Stories could be unpolished and even a little silly.

By opening up the platform to live video and disappearing content, it's clear Instagram is making a more aggressive shift towards becoming a network where users have the freedom to share whatever they want -- whether it be raw, picturesque, or somewhere in between.

“We want Instagram to be a place where you share all of your moments,” Weil told Recode. “[That includes] the more private moments or the inside jokes that are relevant not for your entire Instagram following but for a smaller group of folks.”

Depending on your industry and audience, Instagram's move towards a more consolidated platform for capturing and sharing moments could mean a few different things for your strategy.

"If you're a one person marketing team, managing an ongoing Snapchat presence and an ongoing Instagram Stories presence is a little crazy," noted Emanuele during a Facebook Live recap of the announcements yesterday afternoon. (Check that out below.)

It might not make sense for you to stretch yourself thin across every single platform. Emanuele's rule of thumb: Don't be on a channel just to be on a channel.

So how do you determine which channels are right for you?

"I think it's all about testing," explained one of HubSpot's Content and Growth Marketers, Katherine Boyarsky, in the same live broadcast. "I probably wouldn't [have] bet on our audience being on Snapchat. But they are," she added.

In other words, take what you've learned above and give it a try -- the response might surprise you, or at the very least validate your instincts about your audience's preferences.

And whether these new features are right for you or not, Instagram's announcement signals a larger sea change in marketing. Authenticity and real-time, ephemeral experiences are beating polished and hyper-produced content, and you should be thinking strategically about how to incorporate them into your marketing efforts.

Need help getting up to speed on some of the other real-time advancements on social media? Check out our guide to Facebook Live here, as well as our guide to Instagram Stories here. And for more on our reaction to these new Instagram announcements, check out the two-part Facebook Live recap from Emanuele and Boyarsky below:

Part One:

Part Two:

What questions do you have about the latest Instagram news? Share them in the comments.

how to use instagram for business

Instagram Launches Live Video & Ephemeral Messages: Here’s What You Need to Know

Instagram Updates Recap.jpg

Some of the greatest discoveries of all time came to fruition at the intersection between two ideas. Think about it: Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, pajama jeans, and sporks ... just to name a few.

This week, Instagram proved the power of cross-pollinating ideas once more when it announced the addition of live video on Instagram Stories and disappearing photos and videos in Instagram Direct.

If those new feature announcements look and feel a whole lot like the experiences you're used to on Snapchat and Facebook Live, your instincts aren't wrong. Instagram's new features directly reflect a larger shift in the user's desire to share content "freely and in the moment," as explained in the official announcement. Download our complete guide to using Instagram for business and marketing here. While these features will be rolling out globally over the next few weeks, we wanted to make sure you were equipped with the know-how to start planning your strategy right now. Below, we'll dive into each of the new features in detail, covering everything you need to know about what to expect, how to get started, and what this means for social media managers and marketers.

What's Different About Instagram's New Features?

To answer the question that everyone is asking themselves right off the bat: Yes, the live content update does seem eerily similar to Facebook Live.

But there are actually some noteworthy differences that set Instagram's live video feature apart. And from a technical standpoint, Instagram's live content is better represented as a healthy mix between Facebook Live and Snapchat.

The key difference between live video on Instagram Stories and Facebook Live is that live Instagram video disappears once the publisher finishes the broadcast, creating the transient experience offered by Snapchat.

“It’s a bi-directional experience, and you only get that when you’re actually live with someone,” Instagram's Head of Product Kevin Weil told Recode.

But that's not the only difference. According to that same Recode article, Instagram has no plans to pay media companies or celebrities to hop on a broadcast. This suggests that live Instragam content is intended to be less about creating important moments that need to be saved, and more about sharing unscripted, real-time experiences with friends and family.

Wired Staff Writer Davey Alba echoed this in her recap of the announcements:

With Instagram Stories, Facebook seems to be trying out a tack it used (to great effect) with messaging, splitting the use cases for Facebook Messenger (a tool for expression, as CEO Mark Zuckerberg explains it) and WhatsApp (a “more utilitarian” messaging app). Similarly, Facebook Live looks to be a more robust tool for archiving important video, while Instagram Stories is for your friends’ eyes only."

As for the introduction of disappearing photos and videos in Instagram Direct, the divergence from Snapchat's functionality is less obvious. In fact, one of the only major distinctions between the two is that Instagram makes it easier for users to continuously send disappearing messages to a set group of friends, whereas Snapchat requires you to manually select recipients each time.

In other words, the process for sending Instagram's ephemeral direct messages mirrors a "group text" experience, which is informed by the company's knowledge of users' adoption of Instagram Direct over the last year. Since that launch, users have grown from 80 million to 300 million people around the world -- and many of them are using the messaging feature to share content with group threads, according to the official announcement.

Ready to see these updates in action? Let's walk through each step.

How to Get Started with Live Content and Disappearing Messages on Instagram

How to Go Live on Instagram:

1) Open the Instagram app and navigate to 'Your Story' in the top left corner.


Instagram Live 2.jpeg

2) Toggle left at the bottom of the screen to select the 'Live' option. Then, tap 'Start Live Video.'

Slack for iOS Upload-2.(null).jpeg

Just like on Facebook Live, comments will appear in a feed at the bottom of the screen during your recording. Here's an example we captured:

Instagram Live comments.jpeg

In the live view, you can also keep tabs on the number of viewers checking out your broadcast by referring to the number in the top right corner.

3) Once you end the broadcast, you'll see the following screen, complete with a final view count and timestamp. To return to your feed, tap 'Done.'

Slack for iOS Upload-3.(null).jpeg

We recommend taking note of the total number of viewers and the duration of your broadcast to inform your strategy in the future.

Looking for more ways to inspire your videos down the line? Check out the Explore tab to view live stories from others. Simply tap 'Top Live' to watch live stories unfold in real time, and swipe right and left to skip ahead or go back.

Top Live Stories Instagram.jpeg

How to Send a Disappearing Message on Instagram:

1) Open the Instagram app and swipe right to open the camera view. You can snap a photo by tapping the white circle button, or hold the button down to capture a video.

Instagram Message.jpeg

2) To add text or doodle on your photo or video, use the annotation icons in the top right corner.

Add Doodle Instagram Message.jpeg

(Need artistic inspiration? Check out this roundup of clever Snapchat drawings.)

3) When you're ready to send the message, tap the white arrow button.

Send Private Instagram Message.jpeg

4) Time to select your recipients. You can either select one or several people to send the message to directly or tap 'New Group' in the top right corner to create a group message.

To select users to add to a direct message, simply tap the circle next to their name to turn it into a blue check mark. If you're creating a group, tap 'Create' in the corner once you're done adding recipients.

(Note: You have the option to name the group, too. This makes it easy to find and use it again when you want to send a message to the same people.)

fae4a21e-617b-4e9a-a7b6-8ee6568a6b1f_960.jpg

5) To view your direct messages, tap the new airplane icon in the top right corner of your feed or swipe left.

A few things to note about sending and viewing messages:

  • A blue ring will appear around a new message in your inbox.
  • In a group message, you can see others' responses, as well as who else has seen them.
  • To send a response, simply tap the user's faded profile photo.
  • You'll be notified if a friend replays or screenshots your message.
  • You can only send disappearing messages to those you follow -- regardless of whether your account is private or public.

View Instagram Messages.jpeg

So now you know how to get started, but what does this all mean for marketers and the future of Instagram? Let's walk through all of that below.

The Era of Ephemeral Marketing Is Here

As marketers, you already know the importance of catering your social media content distribution to the platform you're publishing on. You might turn to Twitter for snappy, 140-character breaking news, or Snapchat for a selfie of you and your coworker disguised by a funny filter. But the etiquette on Instagram was in a league of its own -- until just recently, at least.

"Each social network has its differentiating factor, and Instagram has always been a place to showcase the most beautiful, curated version of your life," explained HubSpot's Social Media Marketing Manager Marissa Emanuele in a post following the announcement of Instagram Stories back in August.

The introduction of Instagram Stories was the social network's first foray into a more authentic and open sharing environment, as it lowered the stakes for those feeling pressure to produce the perfect Instagram post. Unlike the traditional Instagram post, Stories could be unpolished and even a little silly.

By opening up the platform to live video and disappearing content, it's clear Instagram is making a more aggressive shift towards becoming a network where users have the freedom to share whatever they want -- whether it be raw, picturesque, or somewhere in between.

“We want Instagram to be a place where you share all of your moments,” Weil told Recode. “[That includes] the more private moments or the inside jokes that are relevant not for your entire Instagram following but for a smaller group of folks.”

Depending on your industry and audience, Instagram's move towards a more consolidated platform for capturing and sharing moments could mean a few different things for your strategy.

"If you're a one person marketing team, managing an ongoing Snapchat presence and an ongoing Instagram Stories presence is a little crazy," noted Emanuele during a Facebook Live recap of the announcements yesterday afternoon. (Check that out below.)

It might not make sense for you to stretch yourself thin across every single platform. Emanuele's rule of thumb: Don't be on a channel just to be on a channel.

So how do you determine which channels are right for you?

"I think it's all about testing," explained one of HubSpot's Content and Growth Marketers, Katherine Boyarsky, in the same live broadcast. "I probably wouldn't [have] bet on our audience being on Snapchat. But they are," she added.

In other words, take what you've learned above and give it a try -- the response might surprise you, or at the very least validate your instincts about your audience's preferences.

And whether these new features are right for you or not, Instagram's announcement signals a larger sea change in marketing. Authenticity and real-time, ephemeral experiences are beating polished and hyper-produced content, and you should be thinking strategically about how to incorporate them into your marketing efforts.

Need help getting up to speed on some of the other real-time advancements on social media? Check out our guide to Facebook Live here, as well as our guide to Instagram Stories here. And for more on our reaction to these new Instagram announcements, check out the two-part Facebook Live recap from Emanuele and Boyarsky below:

Part One:

Part Two:

What questions do you have about the latest Instagram news? Share them in the comments.

how to use instagram for business

What Makes Agency Millennials Different? [New Data]

It goes without saying that employees are the lifeblood of any marketing agency.

They bring the talent needed to fulfill your agency's strategic and creative commitments to clients, and they represent the first line both in new business development and in client service and satisfaction.

They also -- of course -- represent the largest financial commitment in an agency's budget.

Attracting and retaining the best talent is high on the list of priorities for any agency owner. Leaders today faces complex decisions about how best to source, develop and reward the right mix of talents and temperaments to fit the agency's mission and its client base. Subscribe to HubSpot's Agency newsletter today.

Millennials, in particular, seem to be a particular source of heartburn for agency owners. These 18- to 34-year-olds represent the greatest source of new agency employees, and agency owners worry that they are ineffective at motivating these workers and concerned that their investment in their education and training will be for naught if they choose to move elsewhere prematurely.

The Research

Agency Management Institute and Audience Audit decided to tackle this question head-on, by surveying agency employees of all ages and gaining insight into their opinions, attitudes and influences, and the extent to which these differ between millennials and older employees -- or if there’s another explanation for the behavior that agency owners highlight in their complaints.

With the help of HubSpot and Research Now, the survey received over 950 responses from full-time agency employees. 55% of the respondents are millennials (under the age of 35). 40% are younger millennials (26 or younger) and the remaining 60% are 27-34.

45% are older employees -- about half of whom are 35-44.

In this article, we'll examine some of the key takeaways from the report. To read more about the survey and get a much deeper dive on the results, you can download the full research report here. You can also sign up for a free webinar (December 1st at 1 PM eastern) where we'll walk you through all of the results of the study and there will be a live Q&A.

Are Millennials Really Different?

56% of our respondents feel that millennials are fundamentally different than older employees when it comes to their priorities and attitudes about work. Both millennials and non-millennials feel similarly with regard to this question. 24% say they aren't sure.

But our research revealed that assumptions that lump all millennials into one set of attitudes are missing the real story.

The Real Story: Attitudinal Segments

While our research revealed some differences by age, we found much greater divides between agency employees when it comes to their attitudes about work, and what they expect of their employer -- and themselves.

The results were fascinating.

Segment 1: Agency Advocates (37% of respondents)

Agency Advocates love their jobs, feel respected and valued, and say they are appropriately compensated.

They believe their employers understand the needs of younger employees and are focused on keeping their employees happy at work.

They also feel their job provides lots of opportunities to learn important skills, which we know is the most important characteristic of a job for the respondent group overall.

They appear to place the responsibility for their career success largely on their own shoulders. They are less likely to feel that employers have an obligation to help their employees become more successful, or are responsible for helping employees build their own networks.

Segment 2: Prosperity Partners (31% of total)

Prosperity Partners feel employers and employees have a responsibility to help each other. They overwhelmingly agree that people should always be working to build their own brand beyond their current job, but also say that employers have an obligation to help their employees become more successful.

They believe employers should help their employees build social networks, should provide opportunities for employees to socialize and have fun, and should be active in their local communities.

They overwhelmingly believe the ability to collaborate and work in teams is a critical skill for everyone, but say they also need independence and flexibility to do their best work.

Despite the fact that these respondents overwhelmingly say they always give their best effort at work, they are less likely to feel that their compensation is appropriate given their responsibilities, experience and performance.

Segment 3: Millennial Mindset (32% of total)

The final segment, which we have termed the "Millennial Mindset", are much more likely than other respondents to feel that younger workers are both more talented and less valued than older employees.

They are more likely to credit younger workers with being more innovative than older workers, and better at understanding today’s marketing environment.

They also say that younger workers are typically undervalued and deserve more responsibility than they are typically given.

They are less likely to say they give they always give their best effort at work, and that employees have an obligation to help their employer become more successful.

They are much less likely to say that they feel valued, that they love their job and that it provides lots of opportunities for learning important skills.

Millennial Mindset respondents are more likely to see their jobs as just something they have to do for now, to earn money for the things they enjoy doing and to bide their time until they can do something they’d prefer.

The most striking finding about the “Millennial Mindset” segment is that they aren’t all millennials.

In fact, while there are many more millennials in this segment than there are older respondents, 28% are not millennials at all.

And 59% of the millennials in our study are NOT in the "Millennial Mindset" segment (hence the quotations around the segment name).

So while a millennial is more likely to be in this segment than are older respondents, they are still more likely to be either an Agency Advocate or a Prosperity Partner than a "Millennial Mindset" member.

For agency owners, the study offers both challenges and opportunities. It challenges many of the pre-conceived assumptions about agency employees, their attitudes and what matters most to them.

The research was very revealing about employees attitudes regarding compensation, their intentions to stay at their current agency or in the agency business, how they want to contribute and what they expect from their employers.

Implications

Think attitude, not age: It's easy to categorize employees by generation but this study is evidence that owners must be to stop thinking about employees in terms of age, and start thinking of them in terms of attitude.

Not only do they do the majority of millennials a disservice by painting them with the same negative brush, but they fail to recognize the number of older employers who may in fact have many of the attitudes the owners are hoping to avoid.

The stereotypes can get in the way of having meaningful conversations about the motivations, goals and concerns of each employee. They also can create resentment and a sense of being disrespected among employees that owners would like to nurture/keep.

creative-brief-cta

What Makes Agency Millennials Different? [New Data]

It goes without saying that employees are the lifeblood of any marketing agency.

They bring the talent needed to fulfill your agency's strategic and creative commitments to clients, and they represent the first line both in new business development and in client service and satisfaction.

They also -- of course -- represent the largest financial commitment in an agency's budget.

Attracting and retaining the best talent is high on the list of priorities for any agency owner. Leaders today faces complex decisions about how best to source, develop and reward the right mix of talents and temperaments to fit the agency's mission and its client base. Subscribe to HubSpot's Agency newsletter today.

Millennials, in particular, seem to be a particular source of heartburn for agency owners. These 18- to 34-year-olds represent the greatest source of new agency employees, and agency owners worry that they are ineffective at motivating these workers and concerned that their investment in their education and training will be for naught if they choose to move elsewhere prematurely.

The Research

Agency Management Institute and Audience Audit decided to tackle this question head-on, by surveying agency employees of all ages and gaining insight into their opinions, attitudes and influences, and the extent to which these differ between millennials and older employees -- or if there’s another explanation for the behavior that agency owners highlight in their complaints.

With the help of HubSpot and Research Now, the survey received over 950 responses from full-time agency employees. 55% of the respondents are millennials (under the age of 35). 40% are younger millennials (26 or younger) and the remaining 60% are 27-34.

45% are older employees -- about half of whom are 35-44.

In this article, we'll examine some of the key takeaways from the report. To read more about the survey and get a much deeper dive on the results, you can download the full research report here. You can also sign up for a free webinar (December 1st at 1 PM eastern) where we'll walk you through all of the results of the study and there will be a live Q&A.

Are Millennials Really Different?

56% of our respondents feel that millennials are fundamentally different than older employees when it comes to their priorities and attitudes about work. Both millennials and non-millennials feel similarly with regard to this question. 24% say they aren't sure.

But our research revealed that assumptions that lump all millennials into one set of attitudes are missing the real story.

The Real Story: Attitudinal Segments

While our research revealed some differences by age, we found much greater divides between agency employees when it comes to their attitudes about work, and what they expect of their employer -- and themselves.

The results were fascinating.

Segment 1: Agency Advocates (37% of respondents)

Agency Advocates love their jobs, feel respected and valued, and say they are appropriately compensated.

They believe their employers understand the needs of younger employees and are focused on keeping their employees happy at work.

They also feel their job provides lots of opportunities to learn important skills, which we know is the most important characteristic of a job for the respondent group overall.

They appear to place the responsibility for their career success largely on their own shoulders. They are less likely to feel that employers have an obligation to help their employees become more successful, or are responsible for helping employees build their own networks.

Segment 2: Prosperity Partners (31% of total)

Prosperity Partners feel employers and employees have a responsibility to help each other. They overwhelmingly agree that people should always be working to build their own brand beyond their current job, but also say that employers have an obligation to help their employees become more successful.

They believe employers should help their employees build social networks, should provide opportunities for employees to socialize and have fun, and should be active in their local communities.

They overwhelmingly believe the ability to collaborate and work in teams is a critical skill for everyone, but say they also need independence and flexibility to do their best work.

Despite the fact that these respondents overwhelmingly say they always give their best effort at work, they are less likely to feel that their compensation is appropriate given their responsibilities, experience and performance.

Segment 3: Millennial Mindset (32% of total)

The final segment, which we have termed the "Millennial Mindset", are much more likely than other respondents to feel that younger workers are both more talented and less valued than older employees.

They are more likely to credit younger workers with being more innovative than older workers, and better at understanding today’s marketing environment.

They also say that younger workers are typically undervalued and deserve more responsibility than they are typically given.

They are less likely to say they give they always give their best effort at work, and that employees have an obligation to help their employer become more successful.

They are much less likely to say that they feel valued, that they love their job and that it provides lots of opportunities for learning important skills.

Millennial Mindset respondents are more likely to see their jobs as just something they have to do for now, to earn money for the things they enjoy doing and to bide their time until they can do something they’d prefer.

The most striking finding about the “Millennial Mindset” segment is that they aren’t all millennials.

In fact, while there are many more millennials in this segment than there are older respondents, 28% are not millennials at all.

And 59% of the millennials in our study are NOT in the "Millennial Mindset" segment (hence the quotations around the segment name).

So while a millennial is more likely to be in this segment than are older respondents, they are still more likely to be either an Agency Advocate or a Prosperity Partner than a "Millennial Mindset" member.

For agency owners, the study offers both challenges and opportunities. It challenges many of the pre-conceived assumptions about agency employees, their attitudes and what matters most to them.

The research was very revealing about employees attitudes regarding compensation, their intentions to stay at their current agency or in the agency business, how they want to contribute and what they expect from their employers.

Implications

Think attitude, not age: It's easy to categorize employees by generation but this study is evidence that owners must be to stop thinking about employees in terms of age, and start thinking of them in terms of attitude.

Not only do they do the majority of millennials a disservice by painting them with the same negative brush, but they fail to recognize the number of older employers who may in fact have many of the attitudes the owners are hoping to avoid.

The stereotypes can get in the way of having meaningful conversations about the motivations, goals and concerns of each employee. They also can create resentment and a sense of being disrespected among employees that owners would like to nurture/keep.

creative-brief-cta

WhatsApp will now let users watch videos without downloading them

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Feed-twFeed-fb

On the heels of major new features push, WhatsApp has begun rolling out a nifty little option that can improve your video watching experience on its platform.

WhatsApp no longer requires users to finish downloading a video for them to begin watching it. Much like YouTube, and many other streaming service, the video can now be streamed as it being downloaded.

The feature is currently exclusively available on WhatsApp for Android app, with other clients ostensibly receiving this capability in the coming days. 

Users have long complained about how WhatsApp has handled video sharing on its instant messaging and voice calling app. The new feature should shave off some seconds that they waste downloading the video, only to realize that it's not something that needs their urgent attention.  Read more...

More about Facebook, Whatsapp, and Tech

Google’s AI translation tool seems to have invented its own secret internal language

Image (5) terminat-visio2-620x340.jpg for post 215587 All right, don’t panic, but computers have created their own secret language and are probably talking about us right now. Well, that’s kind of an oversimplification, and the last part is just plain untrue. But there is a fascinating and existentially challenging development that Google’s AI researchers recently happened across. Read More

Report: Mark Zuckerberg is so desperate to get Facebook into China, he supports censoring news

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Facebook's wants to connect the world, even more of it than the 1.79 billion people—or more than half the global population—it's already reaching every month.

But there's an entire nation unable to share or react to posts: China, which has blocked Facebook, its associated sites, and its apps.

But on Tuesday, a New York Times report revealed that Facebook's been working on ways to move past that that ban—one of which involves censoring news: A tool that would prevent posts from showing up in a particular geographic region, which according to current and former Facebook employees (who spoke on condition of anonymity to the Times) the company already has.  Read more...

More about China, Censorship, Media, Facebook, and Business

8 ways to consume news without using Facebook

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The era of "fake news" is upon us and it's time to reconsider the ways in which we consume information.

After multiple media reports documented a severe rise in incorrect articles being shared on Facebook, the platform announced its plan to break the "fake news" cycle. 

Facebook's CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote in a post on Saturday the company will introduce a number of measures to help with the infestation of fake news, including stronger detection, easier reporting tools, warnings and new advertising policies. 

Despite this action, the spreading of false news, which even caught President Obama's attention, should be a serious wake up call to start looking outside your News Feed for factual information. Read more...

More about Lists, World, Facebook, Conversations, and Fake News

Google’s redesigned Google Sites goes live

2016-11-22_1042 For the longest time, Google Sites felt like the forgotten app in Google’s productivity suite. Earlier this year, though, the company announced that it would finally give Sites a full overhaul. Today, after a short beta, this new version of Sites is going live for all users. Google Sites is essentially a drag-and-drop website builder for creating both public facing web pages and… Read More

7 Blogging Bloopers Your Business Will Want to Avoid

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As content marketing continues to prove itself in the digital marketing realm, an increasing number of business owners find themselves balancing precariously at the edge of the blogosphere, building up courage to take the plunge.

But if you’re new to the practice, you need to be extra careful not to make any rookie errors. A few simple blogging mistakes can turn an otherwise stellar content marketing strategy into an embarrassing, sticky mess. Thankfully, these blunders are easy to avoid when you know exactly what you shouldn’t be doing.

Here are seven common blogging mistakes your business will want to stay away from…far, far away:

1) Typos, typos, typos

Typos are one of the biggest – and most unforgivable – blogging mistakes. They show a lack of attention to detail, imply sloppy work, and ultimately put off prospective customers. Would you really want to work with a business that lets mistakes slide on their own work? We didn’t think so.

2) No conversion points

Not having conversion points in your content undermines your entire digital marketing strategy. Readers who resonate with your blog will probably be interested in premium content like an ebook, which can further guide them along their buyer’s journey. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to convert them into a lead by not including a call to action within your blog.

3) No images

A blog without images is like a video without sound. And while an image might not always be essential to understand the point of your article, it will make the experience a lot more enjoyable. Inserting images into your blog will hold your audience’s attention for longer, add value to the content, and increase your chance of converting the reader into a lead.

4) Rambling on and on (and on)

We hate to break it to you, but unless someone is a hard-core fan of your content then they probably aren’t going to read your entire 800+ word blog. Writing unnecessarily long posts is a common blogging mistake, as writers confuse quality with quantity. Keep it short and sweet to around 500 words and you’ll be flying. Your reader’s time is valuable, and they’ll appreciate it being treated as such.

5) Sales-speak overload

Think about why your company has a blog in the first place – to attract potential clients with informative and intrinsically valuable content. Don’t undermine this strategy with transparent attempts to push your product on digital passers-by who’ve yet to indicate any interest.

Even if you’re writing a bottom of funnel blog that describes your offering in detail, try to frame it as a solution instead of a direct sales pitch. Your reader is smarter than you think, and will see straight through any attempt to underhandedly force your product on them.

6) Clickbait titles

Clickbait is the scourge of content. Even though shamelessly exploiting human curiosity might get you a few extra clicks and page views, it just isn’t worth it – your reader will lose respect for your company and brand. Your goal should be to build a following of readers who find value in your writing and content – not to become Buzzfeed Wannabe 2.0.

7) Unprofessional content

Your tone should always reflect that you’re writing on behalf of your company. If your culture allows for satirical posts and celebrity gossip, by all means go to town. Just be wary of being overly casual and driving away potential clients looking for serious solutions to their serious problems.

Most readers respond infinitely better to fact-driven blog posts that address their pain points effectively. And if you are overcome by the urge to Biebs it up do everyone a favour and confine it to a personal blog or Tumblr.

At the end of the day, avoiding blogging mistakes only addresses one part of an effective content marketing strategy and a successful business. If you’d like to learn more about content marketing strategy download our ‘5-step plan to generating leads from content marketing’ today!

Angelfish Marketing
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